Looking Back

Looking Back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In shared stories of how you touched us all, and in silence, you are forever in our hearts.

No really…how do you feel?

Trust me, the winter of our discontent is eerily intense when it takes place at this family occasion.

Richard III Act 1 Scene 1…from the perspective of a mob boss.

Glad I could grab a few stills in-between takes.

You can view Wynter Woody’s monologue here   http://vimeo.com/theateroftheear/richard

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NYC…even better at night

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Maybe the night begins here…bottles floating …

Then some guy in a cape shows up…

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Best Friend

Coney

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The Snow Show

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trouble

Philip Seymour HoffmanWhenever I hear of an artist dying, somewhere within those first few moments of disbelief my mind takes me straight to the fact that they will no longer be able to do “their thing” and we will never see them in another movie or play, hear another song, see another photograph etc. Every time I see something about Philip Seymour Hoffman’s passing it’s hard for me to grasp that he is gone. I took these photos of him while covering the 2009 Writer’s Guild East Awards Ceremony where Mr. Hoffman was presenting John Patrick Shanley, the author of Doubt, with an award.  Before presenting Shanley with his award, Hoffman stood at the back of the theater about ten feet away from me. I’m never interested in meeting famous people but I remember wanting to quietly tell him that his performance in Synecdoche, New York was brilliant and that the movie made quite an impression on me, (the type of movie you think about for days after seeing).  We exchanged glances a few times but ultimately I decided to be respectful of his space and not approach him. Regardless, out of all of the celebrities there that evening it didn’t matter to me, as far as I was concerned I was in the presence of one of the greatest actors of all time.  We are fortunate to have had him for the few years we did  but I must say that it is so fucking sad to think of someone so talented and so loved dying alone, ultimately killed by the demons he’s battled for many years.  I keep thinking of the song “Trouble” by Cat Stevens and the 2008 New York Times Magazine profile of Hoffman where he said, “and I put on the Cat Stevens song, ‘Trouble.’ You know, ‘Trouble set me free.’ What a great song! I had forgotten. A lot of times, a song will let you down halfway through, but that song is great to the very end.”

Philip Seymour Hoffman

What caught my eye…

Even though I was probably a bit rushed when placing my order at Starbucks these images really caught my eye, and I guess off the top of my head I would say personally it’s because I love portraits and color, but there is also a sense of a true moment being captured in the work that sparked my interest. So much so that I decided to contact the artist to see if she wouldn’t mind talking about her work a bit so that I could share it on my blog. The artist is eighteen-year old Lexi Karafelis who just graduated Conard high-school in West Hartford, CT and is now attending Pratt Institute on a presidential merit scholarship in graphic communications.

Amy2(1)

Lou Russo: Why do you paint?

Lexi Karafelis: “I guess you could say the reason I create is because I love the complicated individuality of each person and how it is shown on their face and in their body language.”

Matt(1)

LR: Tell me about these four portraits.

LK: “The four portraits are a small series I decided to create in my spare time this summer, they’re all actors, but it was their characters that persuaded me to draw them. All of these characters are facing a dilemma in these moments, each person portrayed is dealing with them in individual ways.”

cumby(1)

LR: Talk about your use of color and light in these portraits.

LK: “The colors of each portrait contributes to the portrayal of each individual. I used warmer colors to convey passion, and cooler hues to portray levelheadedness. The larger the spectrum of colors, the more complicated the emotions of that person may be.”

john2(1)

LK: “Lighting was also important. In these four portraits one side of the face is mostly illuminated with natural and opaque while the other remains dark, or is subject to unnatural tones. This is where I wanted to illustrate that everyone has their armor, but only certain people will let some of those dark tones leak through.”

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